Seeds to plant now:

Indoor or in a heated greenhouse

Hollyhock

Lettuce

Outside

Broad bean

Outside under cover

Broad bean

Onion

Pea

Shallot


Shows and events:

09/11/2018 - 06/01/2019

Festival of Light at Longleat Festival of Light at Longleat

15/11/2018 - 18/11/2018

Country Living - Glasgow Christmas Fair Country Living - Glasgow Christmas Fair

29/11/2018 - 02/12/2018

Country Living - Harrogate Christmas Fair Country Living - Harrogate Christmas Fair

30/11/2018 - 02/12/2018

The Dickens Christmas Festival The Dickens Christmas Festival

01/12/2018 - 01/12/2018

Mistletoe Festival Day Mistletoe Festival Day

07/12/2018 - 09/12/2018

Hampton Court Palace Festive Fayre Hampton Court Palace Festive Fayre

Welcome to the UKGardening Internet site.

The UKGardening web site has been running since 1998. The idea behind the site has always been to provide what we think will be interesting and useful information for the novice gardener.

Jobs to do in the garden this week.

  • Choosing a real Christmas tree.
  • Stop feeding pond fish. Remove, clean and service pond pumps.
  • Spray fruit trees. When all the leaves have fallen, spray with a winter tree wash, these are now vegetable oil based, as the traditional tar oil washes have been banned. This cleans the branches and kills fungal spores and over-wintering insects and their eggs. Note: Only use on a calm, still day, cover nearby ponds and green leaved plants, and wear suitable protection (gloves, goggles and mask are advised).
  • After all the windy weather check fence posts and panels are still secure and repair as necessary. Make sure that the shed roof is still water tight.
  • Prune blackberry and loganberry plants. Cut out the branches that have borne fruit and tie in new shoots to replace them.
  • November is the perfect time of year to plant deciduous trees, fruit trees, bare-rooted roses and hardy herbaceous plants. Doing this now whilst they are entering domancy will allow them to get established without you having to water them during the drier summer days.
  • Double dig borders and vegetable plots, to encourage deep root growth next season. Don't worry about breaking up any large lumps of soil, the winter frost and rain should break them down.
  • Move any planted up pots and containers closer to the house so you can enjoy the colours and textures of the plants through your windows.
  • Lift and store the rhizomes of ginger and canna lillies, laying them in trays of used compost, keeping them damp and away from frost. How to store other tender plants over winter.
  • Clear shed and greenhouse gutters and put chicken wire over the top of them to stop them getting clogged with leaves.
  • Replace summer bedding in borders with winter flowering pansies, polyanthus, wallflowers, myosotis, tulips and daffodils bulbs.
  • Once herbaceous perennials have finished flowering and die back, remove and clean plant supports.
  • Apply manure and dig over heavy soil in the autumn. Don't worry about breaking down large lumps of soil as the winter frost should break these down.
  • Airate, scarify and top dress lawns, to remove moss, dead grass and encourage healthy grass next season. Now is an ideal time to sow or lay a new lawn, while the soil is still warm. Repair worn patches in the lawn with an equal mix of grass seed and compost. Cover with light netting or twigs to keep of animals and remind you where you've sown. When weeding the grass out of my path, I've often transplanted the little clumps to bare patches in the lawn. Top dressing is the application of an autumn feed, which will encourage a strong root growth, whereas a spring lawn feed is high in nitrogen and promoted leaf growth.
  • Plant shrubs and trees whilst the soil is still warm but plants are less likely to be dried out by the sun.
  • Autumn or late winter are the best time to lay a new lawn, as it's damper and cooler, allowing the turf to bed in without you having to worry too much about regular watering. See here: laying a new lawn for further information.
  • Spring flowering bulbs should be available in your local garden centre. Plan where you are going to plant them before you go and buy accordingly, it's great fun filling up those brown bags with bulbs, but can be expensive.

    Bulbs are lifted by commercial growers in late summer/early autumn. The bulbs are full of moisture and sugars, but the longer they are out of the ground the more they will start to dehydrate and use stored sugars, smaller bulbs are especially vulnerable so get them into pots or in the ground as soon as possible after puchasing.

    If you have a small garden, or are planting bulbs in pots, think about using smaller varieties of bulbs. Miniature daffodils ('Tete-a-tete' or 'Topolino' ), dwarf tulips and crocuses.

    Plant bulbs of one variety together for effect. If the soil in your garden is wet and sticky in winter/spring, plant the bulbs in pots and containers, otherwise they'll tend to sit and rot. Plant bulbs 2 to 3 times deeper than their size. If you are growing in large containers, plant the bulbs in layers. Put larger bulbs like tulip and daffodil in first.

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